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2017 May 29

Russia's new submarine has enormous 'wings' to scan the oceans and is TWICE as long as a jumbo jet

A submarine twice the size of the world's largest commercial passenger jet, and with a similar winged design, will soon be exploring the depths of the Arctic circle.

Russia is developing the gigantic new vessel in the hope of exploiting previously untapped natural resources and undertaking scientific research. 

The Arctic Research Submarine is the creation of the Rubin Design Bureau, which was responsible for the Typhoon-class missile submarines launched by the Soviet Union in the 1980s.

Russia is developing a gigantic new submarine in the hopes of exploiting previously untapped natural resources and undertaking scientific research in the Arctic Circle. Pictured - overlaid with the Airbus A380, the world's largest passenger airliner, which is roughly half the size

The vessel will be the largest civilian submersible ever constructed and will be fuelled by a nuclear reactor.

Construction is due to begin in 2020. 

It is designed to conduct surveys using very low frequency active sonar which can penetrate the sea floor.

It has been compared by one expert to the Airbus A380, the world's largest passenger airliner, which is roughly half its size.

This is largely due to the presence of two sets of wing-like sonar receivers that will retract into the ship's hull. 

This will allow the Arctic Research Submarine to make images of its surroundings in every direction, according to reports in Popular Mechanics.

Speaking to the website author H.I. Sutton, the analyst behind the behind the Covert Shores submarine web site and book of the same name, said: 'It is unlikely that the wings will be used to generate lift like an aircraft.

'That would be less efficient because it would have to constantly use its control surfaces to maintain a precise depth.

'This would also generate noise which could make the sonar less effective.

'There will be many places in the Arctic where the submarine cannot go because its wings will make to too wide to navigate the many ice columns which protrude downwards from the ice cap.

'These can extend downwards for hundreds of feet or even to the sea floor.'

The civilian survey submarine will be unarmed, having underwater drone launchers in the place of torpedo tubes that will allow researchers to study harder to reach areas.

It will be 444 feet (135.5 meters) long, 47 feet (14.4 meters) wide and weigh 13,820 tons.

The civilian survey submarine (design pictured) will be unarmed, having underwater drone launchers in the place of torpedo tubes that will allow researchers to study harder to reach areas


It will be 444 feet (135.5 meters) long, 47 feet (14.4 meters) wide and weigh 13,820 tons. The vessel (artist's impression pictured) will be able to operate at depths of up to 1,300 feet (400 metres)

It's wingspan will be 330 feet (100 meters) and it will be able to reach a maximum speed of 12.6 knots.

The submarine would have a crew of 40 and be capable of diving on missions lasting up to 90 days, he added.

The vessel will be able to operate at depths of up to 1,300 feet (400 metres).

The Airbus A380, by comparison, is 240 feet (73 Metres) long, 23 feet (7.14 Metre) wide and weighs 305 tons when empty.

The submarine's wingspan will be 330 feet (100 meters) and it will be able to reach a maximum speed of 12.6 knots, with a cruising speed of around 3 knots

It has a wingspan of 260 feet (79.8 metres) and can reach speeds of up to Mach 0.89.

Russia is hoping to find mineral and energy resources in areas of the Arctic that are being uncovered by global warming and melting ice.

The government has laid claim to large parts of the North Pole and Arctic circle in recent years.

Source: www.dailymail.co.uk; Tim Collins

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